【betway必威体育】《经济学人》看中国之富了一点点

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《Behind the Beautiful Forevers》是一本由Katherine Boo著作,Random
House出版的Hardcover图书,本书定价:USD
27.00,页数:256,特精心从网络上整理的一些读者的读后感,希望对大家能有帮助。

Poverty in China

Just a little bit richer

How much has a flagship official scheme played in China’s
impressive record of reducing poverty?
Apr 4th 2015 | TIANZHEN COUNTY, SHANXI | From the print edition

flagship: The chief one of a related
group;王牌,佼佼者:同一类(组)中最重要的那个;
e.g. the flagship of a newspaper chain; 多家报社中的佼佼者
the flagship of a line of reference books;参考书系列中的王牌
scheme: A scheme is a plan or arrangement involving many people
which is made by a government or other organization. (mainly BRIT; in
AM, use program); 计划,方案;
e.g. schemes to help combat unemployment.
e.g. teacher training schemes;a pension scheme;

THE villagers of Dingjiayan subsist on corn, potatoes, sunflowers
and the few vegetables they grow. They sell the surplus and buy meat
and a few other necessities in the nearby county town of Tianzhen. Its
mud-and-brick buildings, and its setting among dusty hills in the
north-eastern corner of Shanxi province, offer little to the occasional
visitor to distinguish it from countless other parts of China where hard
work brings but a meagre living. Yet Tianzhen county, of which
Dingjiayan is a part, is one of just 592 areas that the central
government designates as “impoverished”.
对于一个典型的“贫困县”的描写。

subsist on: to stay alive when you only have small amounts of food
or money;同义词: survive;
e.g. We had to subsist on bread and water.
Old people often have to subsist on very low incomes.
surplus: an amount of something that is more than what is needed
or used;同义词: excess;
e.g. Few people have large sums of surplus cash.
but: Merely; just; only:
e.g. hopes that lasted but a moment.
meagre: a meagre amount of food, money etc is too small and is
much less than you need
e.g. meagre income/earnings/wages etc
designates: To give a name or title to; characterize;
e.g. designate the bridge as a historic landmark;
impoverished: very poor; without money;
e.g. impoverished peasants; the impoverished areas of the city

China’s official threshold for rural poverty is an annual income of
2,300 yuan ($370) per person. But the criteria for classifying a village
or county are complex and often revised. They include comparisons of
poverty rates and average incomes with those of the province,
adjustments for inflation, quotas on the number of villages that may
count as poor and a ban on including villages that own collective
enterprises, whatever their income level. Though dozens of places have
been listed and delisted every few years since the 1990s, the total has
remained curiously fixed—at 592.
“贫困地区”的划分标准。

threshold: the level at which sth starts to happen;
e.g. He has a low boredom threshold (= he gets bored easily).
I have a high pain threshold (= I can suffer a lot of pain before I
start to react).
My earnings are just above the tax threshold (= more than the amount
at which you start paying tax).

An “impoverished” designation brings substantial subsidies. But
Ding Tianyu, who has lived in Dingjiayan for all his 73 years, says he
hardly notices. Most households earn about 10,000 yuan a year, he says,
and get a subsidy of 80 yuan for each mu (614 square metres) of land
they farm. “I have five mu,” Mr Ding says. “When there is enough rain I
am fine, and when I get the subsidy I feel just a little bit richer.”
划分成“贫困县”后带来的补助。

substantial: large in amount or number; 同义词: considerable
e.g. We have the support of a substantial number of parents.
a substantial salary/loan;a substantial improvement/decrease;
subsidies: money that is paid by a government or other authority
in order to help an industry or business, or to pay for a public
service; 津贴,补贴;
e.g. trade/agricultural subsidies
to increase / reduce the level of subsidy

With bustling shops and a fair number of pricey cars on its
roads, Tianzhen’s county town does not, by Chinese standards, feel
impoverished. There is little disclosure about how subsidies are
used, says a restaurant owner. “We are told a lot of it goes into the
local credit union and that we can apply for loans there, but they only
lend to people with good connections.”
贫困补贴去向不明。

bustling: full of energetic and noisy activity;熙熙攘攘的;
e.g. a bustling city;
The flower market was bustling with shoppers.
pricey: expensive
disclosure: the act of giving people new or secret
information;公开;同义词: revelation;
e.g. the disclosure of private medical information

Beautiful on the mountains
In 2012, when the list was last updated, Xinshao county in Hunan in
south-central China was added. Local officials used the county’s
official website to trumpet this “exceptional good tidings
after two years of “arduous efforts” and “untold hardships”. A large
roadside board added its “ardent congratulations”. After nationwide
criticism, the officials accepted that their words had been badly
chosen. But their cheer was understandable: the official designation was
worth an extra 560m yuan for the county each year from the central
government.
湖南新邵县庆祝入选“贫困县”的讽刺例子。

trumpet: to tell everyone about something that you are proud of,
especially in an annoying way
e.g. They are proudly trumpeting the fact that they are creating more
jobs.
good/glad tidings: good news; (OLD-FASHIONED)
arduous: difficult to accomplish; demanding considerable mental
effort and skill
e.g. arduous task/work; arduous journey/voyage

The episode caused many to question the value of the system and the
perverse incentives it creates for local governments. A commentary
last year in the Legal Daily claimed that many places were misusing the
funds and had fudged their figures to qualify as impoverished.
Officials from the State Council Leading Group Office of Poverty
Alleviation and Development, which manages the list, have acknowledged
widespread abuses. In February it banned lavish new buildings and “image
projects” in officially designated poor areas.
对扶贫系统的价值及地方政府的动机的质疑。

episode:You can refer to an event or a short period of time as an
episode if you want to suggest that it is important or unusual, or has
some particular quality; 片段, 插曲;
e.g. That’s an episode in my life I’d rather forget!
perverse: Directed away from what is right or good; perverted;
不正当的,堕落的
fudged: to change important figures or facts to deceive people;
同义词: fake; falsify;
e.g. fudge casualty figures

State television reported on two counties, one in Ningxia and one in
Hubei, where local governments spent 100m yuan each on new headquarters.
In March, during China’s annual full legislative session, the
council’s poverty head, Liu Yongfu, raised a different question about
the programme. He told the Southern Metropolis, a newspaper, that
hundreds of counties would be taken off the list by 2020. “If a poor
area as big as a county still exists, then can Chinese society still be
called moderately prosperous?” he asked.
政府准备采取的行动。

China’s annual full legislative session:
(全国人大)年度全体立法会议;
be taken off: be removed;

Attainment of a “moderately prosperous society” is a goal that previous
Chinese leaders set and that Xi Jinping, the current president, has
adopted as well. Much progress has been made since reforms began in
earnest
in the late 1970s. China claims to have lifted 620m people out
of poverty since then. Others may quibble over that number—the World
Bank puts it at 500m—but few question the premise that China deserves
immense credit for
alleviating so much poverty.
中国政府在减轻贫困方面的成就。

in earnest: more seriously and with more force or effort than
before; 严肃地,坚定不移地;
e.g. Campaigning will begin in earnest tomorrow…
quibble over/about: to argue about small unimportant details
e.g. Let’s not quibble over minor details.
premise: a statement that is assumed to be true and from which a
conclusion can be drawn
e.g. the basic premise of her argument; a false premise
credit: approval for an act, ability, or quality; praise; 赞扬;
e.g. get/take/claim/receive/deserve (the) credit;
They claim all the credit for themselves and shift all the blame on
others.
Some of the credit for my success goes to my wife.
alleviating: to make something less painful or difficult to deal
with;
e.g. alleviate the problem/situation/suffering

Much still remains, however. A little uphill from Dingjiayan sits a
smaller village, Dingyuanyao. Its higher elevation means it gets less
water, and a resident says most of its 90 residents will clear just
1,000 yuan a year after paying for seeds and fertiliser. Some own
motorbikes and televisions, and they are grateful for the basic health
insurance they receive. They laugh in unison when asked if they
receive subsidies. The arrival of electricity 30 years ago was a vast
improvement, they agree. But little has changed in their lives since
then.
依旧有不少乡村在贫困中挣扎。

uphill: towards the top of a hill;
clear: to gain (a given amount) as net profit or earnings
e.g. Diane clears £20,000 a year.
unison: if people do or say sth in unison, they all do it at the
same time
laugh in unison: 哄堂大笑;

From the print edition: China


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《Behind the Beautiful Forevers》读后感:贫困与反抗

无释义复读版:

作者反反复复询问这样一个问题,为何穷人不反抗,为何不公平的社会不会坍塌?
why the poor don’t rise up, and why unequal societies don’t simply
implode

Poverty in China

Just a little bit richer

How much has a flagship official scheme played in China’s impressive
record of reducing poverty?
Apr 4th 2015 | TIANZHEN COUNTY, SHANXI | From the print edition

THE villagers of Dingjiayan subsist on corn, potatoes, sunflowers and
the few vegetables they grow. They sell the surplus and buy meat and a
few other necessities in the nearby county town of Tianzhen. Its
mud-and-brick buildings, and its setting among dusty hills in the
north-eastern corner of Shanxi province, offer little to the occasional
visitor to distinguish it from countless other parts of China where hard
work brings but a meagre living. Yet Tianzhen county, of which
Dingjiayan is a part, is one of just 592 areas that the central
government designates as “impoverished”.

China’s official threshold for rural poverty is an annual income of
2,300 yuan ($370) per person. But the criteria for classifying a village
or county are complex and often revised. They include comparisons of
poverty rates and average incomes with those of the province,
adjustments for inflation, quotas on the number of villages that may
count as poor and a ban on including villages that own collective
enterprises, whatever their income level. Though dozens of places have
been listed and delisted every few years since the 1990s, the total has
remained curiously fixed—at 592.

An “impoverished” designation brings substantial subsidies. But Ding
Tianyu, who has lived in Dingjiayan for all his 73 years, says he hardly
notices. Most households earn about 10,000 yuan a year, he says, and get
a subsidy of 80 yuan for each mu (614 square metres) of land they farm.
“I have five mu,” Mr Ding says. “When there is enough rain I am fine,
and when I get the subsidy I feel just a little bit richer.”

With bustling shops and a fair number of pricey cars on its roads,
Tianzhen’s county town does not, by Chinese standards, feel
impoverished. There is little disclosure about how subsidies are used,
says a restaurant owner. “We are told a lot of it goes into the local
credit union and that we can apply for loans there, but they only lend
to people with good connections.”

Beautiful on the mountains
In 2012, when the list was last updated, Xinshao county in Hunan in
south-central China was added. Local officials used the county’s
official website to trumpet this “exceptional good tidings” after two
years of “arduous efforts” and “untold hardships”. A large roadside
board added its “ardent congratulations”. After nationwide criticism,
the officials accepted that their words had been badly chosen. But their
cheer was understandable: the official designation was worth an extra
560m yuan for the county each year from the central government.

The episode caused many to question the value of the system and the
perverse incentives it creates for local governments. A commentary last
year in the Legal Daily claimed that many places were misusing the funds
and had fudged their figures to qualify as impoverished. Officials from
the State Council Leading Group Office of Poverty Alleviation and
Development, which manages the list, have acknowledged widespread
abuses. In February it banned lavish new buildings and “image projects”
in officially designated poor areas.

State television reported on two counties, one in Ningxia and one in
Hubei, where local governments spent 100m yuan each on new headquarters.
In March, during China’s annual full legislative session, the council’s
poverty head, Liu Yongfu, raised a different question about the
programme. He told the Southern Metropolis, a newspaper, that hundreds
of counties would be taken off the list by 2020. “If a poor area as big
as a county still exists, then can Chinese society still be called
moderately prosperous?” he asked.

Attainment of a “moderately prosperous society” is a goal that previous
Chinese leaders set and that Xi Jinping, the current president, has
adopted as well. Much progress has been made since reforms began in
earnest in the late 1970s. China claims to have lifted 620m people out
of poverty since then. Others may quibble over that number—the World
Bank puts it at 500m—but few question the premise that China deserves
immense credit for alleviating so much poverty.

Much still remains, however. A little uphill from Dingjiayan sits a
smaller village, Dingyuanyao. Its higher elevation means it gets less
water, and a resident says most of its 90 residents will clear just
1,000 yuan a year after paying for seeds and fertiliser. Some own
motorbikes and televisions, and they are grateful for the basic health
insurance they receive. They laugh in unison when asked if they receive
subsidies. The arrival of electricity 30 years ago was a vast
improvement, they agree. But little has changed in their lives since
then.

From the print edition: China

作者的答案:贫民窟的居民具有deep, idiosyncratic
intelligence这样的优秀品质,但是他们太穷了,每日为生活所迫,以至于无法团结起来反抗社会不公。

《Behind the Beautiful
Forevers》读后感:哪怕像狗一样卑贱的人,也有他自己的生活

在孟买的国际机场对面,有一堵墙,墙上写的是意大利瓷砖的广告词:beautiful
forever,beautiful
forever。。。而在这座墙和光鲜的广告背后,是巨大的平民窟。这里混杂着来自印度各地,不同种族宗教信仰的人们。几乎所有的人没有固定的工作,仅仅靠拾机场周边的垃圾为生。过着悲惨又无奈的生活。

作为世界上最大民主国家的印度,社会发展不平衡。存在的很严重的问题。这本书可看作印度社会最底层的一个缩影。而书中不同人物的遭遇,是现实的样本。

尽管作为印度最大城市和经济中心的孟买的经济高速发展,但并没有给贫民窟的居民带来任何实质的好处。贫穷,疾病,缺乏饮用水,糟糕的卫生条件和居住条件。。。更糟糕的是来自政府官员和警察的欺压凌辱。腐败夺走了政府和慈善机构的救济。没有人在乎他们的存在。

在这里,人们是多么的脆弱。也许是和邻居争吵这样的小事都会毁了一个家庭的生计。也正因为生活本已很糟糕了,一点点小事情都会让人轻易的放弃不值得可惜的生命。因为生存空间的狭小和资源的有限,在这里,人与人之间的关系,利益是首要的,而不是道义。向上爬的过程中难免会踩到其他人。

可是卑微的他们也有自己生活和希望。也许只是渴望有份体面的工作,或者得到一点点尊重和认可。他们中的有些人甚至有时候觉得自己与众不同。但这些希望在冷酷的现实面前是那么的无助,不管你多么的努力。不希望住在铁皮棚里的结果,往往是最终睡到了大街上。

读这本书的过程中反复问自己,为什么他们能够忍受如此悲惨的生活?同时也佩服他们活下来和继续生活的勇气。希望微乎其微但并不是没有。结尾处,拆迁的工作已经逐步的进行,等待他们的,又将会是怎么样的命运呢?

《Behind the Beautiful Forevers》读后感:美好永远只是口号

Katherine
Boo是普利策奖得主。我买这本书一是因为它纽约时报2012年推荐的年度最佳之一,二是因为题材。我对写得好的非虚构一直有兴趣,而且自从2007年的短暂印度行以来,我对印度一直保持一种有距离的好奇心。不过读这本书的过程很拖拉,总算把它结束了!

oo的文笔很漂亮,和何伟一样,赋予非虚构作品很强的文学性。她写这本书很辛苦,从2007年到2011年都在孟买机场旁边一个叫Annawadi的贫民窟里做深入调查,其间还经历了08年的那次著名恐怖袭击——说起来,那也是我离恐怖活动最近的一次。恐怖袭击的第二天,本来我该飞去孟买做展会的,而且展会就在被袭击的泰姬酒店里。恐怖袭击发生的时候,我同事已经在戴高乐机场准备要登机,临时被喊回去。

这本书可真是本悲惨之书。贫民窟里的贫民,不但每天为生计辛苦奔波,忍受着极端恶劣的生活环境,还要应付无处不在的暴力与腐败。这本书里提到的印度社会的腐败程度,真是触目惊心。你在中国呆着已经觉得很不爽了吧,去印度试试看:书中写到的贫民窟里一家人因为和邻居发生争执,邻居点火自焚了,从此他们一家陷入深深的困境。一家里好几个成员都被邻居的丈夫起诉了,在应付诉讼的每一个环节,他们都被勒索:有点权势宣称能出头帮他们平息事端的邻居、作假证的邻居、警察、公诉人……所有人都抓住所有的机会要从每一道可能的缝隙里捞钱。本来你以为一个密集的社区虽然贫穷,但人们有可能互相扶持,可其实并不是,他们有限的气力仅仅能顾着自己与家人,稍微境况好一点还要应付眼红的邻居,摆脱贫穷如此艰难,有些人就处心积虑踩着比自己更穷的人往上爬。贫穷真的只能滋生罪恶,整体上大家互相拽着一起下落。Boo甚至认为,因为穷人们的内耗,维持了社会脆弱的平衡。

oo在这本书里不试图深入讨论任何问题或者给出任何解决之道,她给自己的责任是呈现。所以,这本书里详尽叙述的,是一些小人物的命运——当然和大时代密不可分,是现实的折射和缩影。但不知道是不是叙述角度的问题,这种呈现真的颇让人绝望,让人充满无力感,也不太能深刻理解滋生问题的真正土壤是什么。诚然小人物们并不是没有希望(有些是真的没有,所以选择了自杀),他们尝试各种可能性,希望生活变得更好一点,这种期许一直都在。可是整个大环境是这么问题丛生,出路这么少。副标题里说到Life,
Death &
Hope,可是希望这部分真是很勉强。Boo自己也说,在贫民窟采访期间,孩子们给她的触动最大,他们最无所畏惧,最真诚,可是长大以后,他们也难免变成父母那样对在街上被车撞了流血到死的流浪汉视而不见的人。阅读时最大的盘踞不去的问题是,一个号称民主的国家,为什么腐败程度比集权国家还有过之而无不及?这真的是个在上升的社会吗?代价是不是牺牲了所有这些最底层的人?

总之这本书太虐了,我要换换脑子读本愉快的书去……

《Behind the Beautiful
Forevers》读后感:面对崩溃的底层,我们该做些什么

对我来说,Kathrine Boo的Behind the Beautiful
Forevers不是一本容易读的书,看完之后记下了五百多个不认识的单词,这大概是自从我十多年前考完六级之后最大规模的一次词汇扩充了。不愧是普利策奖得主,文笔果然了得,这几百个生词多半是一些形容词和副词,光是描绘恶臭肮脏的意思的词恐怕就不下十个。我不是自吹词汇量多大,但这许也说明,这本书描绘的,是一个偏离在主流视野之外的世界,因此不得不用到很多主流世界里也不常用的词汇。

我曾经去过孟买五次,有四次住在机场附近的Saki Naka地区,就是书中的Abdul
Husain卖废品的地方,曾住在俯瞰贫民窟的假日酒店,远远望过楼下和山坡上那一片灰蓝灰蓝的棚户区。这种联系,让我一下子觉得和Abdul很近。

这个故事,看完之后真的是让人胸闷,有那么一群人在过着那样的生活,却几乎看不到任何改善的希望,维持现状都成了问题。这是一个崩溃的底层,人退化为了动物,为了生存,日复一日地在垃圾堆为了一个瓶子、一小块铁皮而争斗,手停下来,嘴就得停下来,没有任何多余的时间和精力去想想未来。而即使是这样悲惨无力的一群弱者,除了要面对来自同类的算计和争斗,还有一群贪婪冷血的腐败官员像秃鹫一样持续盘旋于头顶上方,随时准备抓住机会进行无情的掠夺。人的价值、尊严在这样的一个世界里退化到几乎微乎其微的地步。人性恶的一面被淋漓尽致地展现,而善的一面则像风中之烛一般飘摇。腐败无孔不入、无处不在,在Boo的笔下读来那么让人气愤和郁闷,然而在那些孟买贫民看来,这就是生活的本质,每天都存在,不会因任何人而改变,就像贫民窟里污浊脏乱的环境、限时供应的水一样,除了接受这样的现实,似乎没有别的选择。但腐败对这个社会的腐蚀是显而易见的,没有人相信勤劳致富,多劳多得。Abdul一家,如果是在另外一个不那么腐败的国家,也许就能够凭借自己的精明实干和勤俭节约,通过垃圾回收的小小生意一步步改进自己的处境,花上一代人的时间脱离贫民阶层。在书里,Abdul一家也曾经看到了这样的一丝希望。然而Fatima出于嫉妒的自焚,各色试图从中渔利的秃鹫和低效无能的司法系统彻底摧毁了Abdul一家的这一个小小梦想。到最后,遍体鳞伤,回到原点。而他们仍然在庆幸还没有被彻底摧毁,毕竟,人都还在。书中唯一显著改善了自己境遇的Asha,很明白自己要什么,也很清楚该怎么做去换她要的东西,她的原始动机也是改善自己和家人的生活,但她在这个追寻的过程中,抛开了道德和良知,成功把自己改造为一个新类型的“人”。如果一个社会中只有这样的“人”可以获得成功,那么这样的社会还有什么希望可言?在这样的社会中,人的价值轻如草芥,一个一个生命悄无声息地熄灭枯萎,不会激起一丝涟漪。

郁闷还有一个来源,就是不由自主地把印度和中国对比。而两个国家在道德沦丧和底层崩溃这个方面所展现出的惊人相似是很多国人都能够感同身受的。我们也许比印度拥有更加干净整洁的街道,更加高效率的政府。但我们同样有与恶势力的勾结构陷无辜的警察,有只知道收钱不管病人死活的医生,有伪造材料骗取政府资金的所谓慈善组织,有爱钱胜过爱学生的老师,有骗取为穷人建造的保障房的官员和商人。我们知道这些并不是偶尔发生的孤立事件,相反它们似乎正在这个社会中蔓延开来。这是让我们这个社会中弥漫的浮躁不安、缺乏信任的气氛的来源,而这种浮躁不安和缺乏信任反过来又助长了这些事件。于是,我们嗅到了一丝危险的气息,那是我们所共有的这个社会滑向崩溃的危险信号。

该怎么做?一个清明、廉洁和高效的政府难道会从天而降么?一个充满友善、信任、强者不凌弱、弱者不绝望的社会会自动到来么?当然不会。贫穷问题不可能依靠财富的重新分配来彻底解决,而要依靠创造自由、公平的发展环境,让每个人有机会依靠自己的能力和劳动创造并分享价值。印度是一个程序上的民主国家,然而这个国家的民主只是停留在形式上,主流的价值观和思维方式并没有发生相匹配的改变,中产阶级并没有建立起社会责任感,他们所控制的舆论也没有关注弱者的自觉。Annawadi第一次走进媒体的视野居然是因为动物保护主义者关心几匹马的生存状态,而没有人对近在咫尺的人道灾难有半点关心。公民社会(据说这个词现在是个禁忌,呜呼!)的建立,要靠相对有钱有闲的中产阶级的发起,要靠每个人对于公平正义的理念的信任和坚持。从言论自由和舆论监督开始,看住政府的腐败之手。中产阶级要关心底层社会的发展,否则,没有人能够安全地享受发展的成果。政府做不好底层的启蒙、教育和发展,那就由中产阶级组织起来自发地做,一点点改变。在还有人挨饿受冻的时候,奢谈猫狗的权利保护实在是一件很弱智的事情。在中国和印度的中产阶级现在还很弱小,但他们将是社会发展稳定的内核。

我们可以聊以自慰的是,在当下的中国,中产阶级似乎正在觉醒,越来越多的人,有意识地参与到让这个社会变得更好的各种事务中去。但是我们也要看到,我们的政府和执政党似乎还没有做好准备适应这样的形势。希望他们能早点想明白,否则,Boo笔下的Annawadi也许有一天也会出现在我们身边。

《Behind the Beautiful Forevers》读后感:We live like in HAVEN

One review on Amazon.com said “It’s hard book to read, but I highly
recommend it.” At first sight I thought maybe the reviewer meant the
difficult vocabulary, the vocabulary truly is difficult, for the author
choose to depict slum life in India, which makes the vocabulary unknown
to us(thus difficult) because we didn’t know much of slum life. But over
half-way through this book, its context struck me so much that it
overshadowed the difficult vocabulary.

As many readers describe the distressed slum life and corruption as
“difficult to accept”, “want to scream for them”, I would not spare much
space to write about slum life in this book. You can go read by
yourself: the author is a newspaper person and had won Pulitzer Prize
and had carried deep investigation into slum life for years. So I’m sure
you can feel its powerfulness.

There is the boy who wanted a iPod not for entertainment but for it
could drown out neighbors’ noises and allow him to hear only what he
want. There was also another boy who felt closer to people when at
places high above the ground because if on the ground people would
consider him staring.

Mental health and physical health both fucked: Bad lungs were a toll you
paid to live near progress. As the author puts it.

It goes against what Rousseau said:” When the people shall have nothing
more to eat, they will eat the rich.” They didn’t eat the rich. They eat
the more miserable people. “At the heart of her bad nature, like many
bad natures, was probably envy.” This probably explains why poor people
eat poorer people. “And at the heart of envy was possibly hope – that
the good fortune of others might one day be hers.” That’s probably why
they are all so desperate, though things usually don’t move in their
favor.

Asha, the slumlord, the one seeking betterment though she was already
way better than the slum people, still tried as many schemes as
possible. ” But instead of admitting she was making little progress, she
invents new definitions of success.” I feel like Asha, ambitious and
want to do great things, but now I wonder whether I can hold straight to
my goal without losing conscience, which goes against my previous
ultimate optimism that I will definitely reach my goal and still be
myself. Please don’t put this wrong! It doesn’t mean I won’t work hard
and stay firm as hard as before but under such pace of globalization and
development and so many “washed away” people, are you sure you won’t be
washed away? The cruelty of society is not we, taking so many things
for granted that the slum children dream of would ever imagine. So
better to hold such mindset.

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